Extended-spectrum β-lactamase/AmpC- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in animals: a threat for humans?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_80B42E142C8A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Extended-spectrum β-lactamase/AmpC- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in animals: a threat for humans?
Périodique
Clinical microbiology and infection
Auteur(s)
Madec J.Y., Haenni M., Nordmann P., Poirel L.
ISSN
1469-0691 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1198-743X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
11/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Numéro
11
Pages
826-833
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
There has been a great and long-term concern that extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae occurring in animals may constitute a public-health issue. A large number of factors with complex interrelations contribute to the spread of those bacteria among animals and humans. ESBL/AmpC- or carbapenemase-encoding genes are most often located on mobile genetic elements favouring their dissemination. Some shared reservoirs of ESBL/AmpC or carbapenemase genes, plasmids or clones have been identified and suggest cross-transmissions. Even though exposure to animals is regarded as a risk factor, evidence for a direct transfer of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria from animals to humans through close contacts is limited. Nonetheless, the size of the commensal ESBL/AmpC reservoir in non-human sources is dramatically rising. This may constitute an indirect risk to public health by increasing the gene pool from which pathogenic bacteria can pick up ESBL/AmpC/carbapenemase genes. The extent to which food contributes to potential transmission of ESBL/AmpC producers to humans is also not well established. Overall, events leading to the occurrence of ESBL/AmpC- and carbapenemase-encoding genes in animals seem very much multifactorial. The impact of animal reservoirs on human health still remains debatable and unclear; nonetheless, there are some examples of direct links that have been identified.
Mots-clé
Animals, Bacterial Proteins/genetics, Cats, Cattle, Dogs, Enterobacteriaceae/drug effects, Enterobacteriaceae/enzymology, Enterobacteriaceae/genetics, Enterobacteriaceae/pathogenicity, Enterobacteriaceae Infections/drug therapy, Enterobacteriaceae Infections/microbiology, Enterobacteriaceae Infections/veterinary, Humans, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Poultry, Swine, Zoonoses, beta-Lactam Resistance/genetics, beta-Lactamases/genetics, Animal, CMY, CTX-M, Carbapenemase, ESBL/AmpC, Food, IMP, NDM, OXA-48, VIM
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/11/2017 19:17
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:41
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