Total shoulder arthroplasty: downward inclination of the glenoid component to balance supraspinatus deficiency.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7AD804DACA0E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Total shoulder arthroplasty: downward inclination of the glenoid component to balance supraspinatus deficiency.
Périodique
Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Auteur(s)
Terrier A., Merlini F., Pioletti D.P., Farron A.
ISSN
1532-6500[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Volume
18
Numéro
3
Pages
360-365
Langue
anglais
Résumé
HYPOTHESIS: Supraspinatus deficiency associated with total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) provokes eccentric loading and may induce loosening of the glenoid component. A downward inclination of the glenoid component has been proposed to balance supraspinatus deficiency.
METHODS: This hypothesis was assessed by a numeric musculoskeletal model of the glenohumeral joint during active abduction. Three cases were compared: TSA with normal muscular function, TSA with supraspinatus deficiency, and TSA with supraspinatus deficiency and downward inclination of the glenoid.
RESULTS: Supraspinatus deficiency increased humeral migration and eccentric loading. A downward inclination of the glenoid partly balanced the loss of stability, but this potential advantage was counterbalanced by an important stress increase within the glenoid cement. The additional subchondral bone reaming required to incline the glenoid component indeed reduced the bone support, increasing cement deformation and stress.
CONCLUSION: Glenoid inclination should not be obtained at the expense of subchondral bone support.
Mots-clé
Arthroplasty, Replacement/adverse effects, Arthroplasty, Replacement/methods, Biomechanics, Computer Simulation, Finite Element Analysis, Humans, Joint Instability/physiopathology, Joint Instability/prevention & control, Joint Prosthesis, Models, Anatomic, Muscle Contraction/physiology, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Prosthesis Design, Prosthesis Failure, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Sensitivity and Specificity, Shoulder Joint/physiopathology, Shoulder Joint/surgery, Stress, Mechanical
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
18/01/2010 17:29
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:36
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