In vivo liver tissue mechanical properties by Transient Elastography: comparison with Dynamic Mechanical Analysis.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7AD0CCB6AC19
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
In vivo liver tissue mechanical properties by Transient Elastography: comparison with Dynamic Mechanical Analysis.
Périodique
Biorheology
Auteur(s)
Chatelin S., Oudry J., Périchon N., Sandrin L., Allemann P., Soler L., Willinger R.
ISSN
1878-5034 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0006-355X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
48
Numéro
2
Pages
75-88
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Understanding the mechanical properties of human liver is one of the most critical aspects of its numerical modeling for medical applications or impact biomechanics. Generally, model constitutive laws come from in vitro data. However, the elastic properties of liver may change significantly after death and with time. Furthermore, in vitro liver elastic properties reported in the literature have often not been compared quantitatively with in vivo liver mechanical properties on the same organ. In this study, both steps are investigated on porcine liver. The elastic property of the porcine liver, given by the shear modulus G, was measured by both Transient Elastography (TE) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Shear modulus measurements were realized on in vivo and in vitro liver to compare the TE and DMA methods and to study the influence of testing conditions on the liver viscoelastic properties. In vitro results show that elastic properties obtained by TE and DMA are in agreement. Liver tissue in the frequency range from 0.1 to 4 Hz can be modeled by a two-mode relaxation model. Furthermore, results show that the liver is homogeneous, isotropic and more elastic than viscous. Finally, it is shown in this study that viscoelastic properties obtained by TE and DMA change significantly with post mortem time and with the boundary conditions.
Mots-clé
Animals, Elasticity, Elasticity Imaging Techniques/methods, Female, Liver/physiology, Swine, Viscosity
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
27/01/2016 8:10
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:36
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