How do adolescents manage information in the relationship with their parents? A latent class analysis of disclosure, keeping secrets, and lying

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Baudat et al. (2022, How do adolescents manage information in the relationship with their parents A latent class analysis of disclosure, keeping secrets, and lying).pdf (953.85 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_77EDAD33166E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
How do adolescents manage information in the relationship with their parents? A latent class analysis of disclosure, keeping secrets, and lying
Périodique
Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Baudat S., Mantzouranis G., Van Petegem S., Zimmermann G.
ISSN
0047-2891 (print)
1573-6601 (electronic)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
51
Pages
1134-1151
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Adolescents’ use of disclosure and concealment strategies in the relationships with their parents have important implications for their adjustment. Little research has taken a person-centered approach to identifying the different patterns of adolescent’s information management in relationships with both parents, and has examined the differences between these profiles with respect to parenting, motivation to disclose, and alcohol use. This study explored adolescents’ information management constellations with their mothers and fathers, and how these patterns differ in terms of perceived need-supportive parenting, autonomous reasons for disclosure, and problematic alcohol use. Three hundred thirty-two Swiss adolescents (45% female; Mage = 15.01 years) reported information management strategies used with each parent (disclosure, keeping secrets, lying), perceptions of maternal and paternal need-supportive parenting (involvement, autonomy support, structure), autonomous reasons for disclosure, and problematic alcohol use. Latent class analyses revealed three classes: Reserved (37%), Communicators (36%), and Deceptive (27%). Comparisons across classes showed that adolescents in the Communicators class reported the highest levels of parental involvement and autonomy support, as well as autonomous reasons for disclosure. Adolescents in the Deceptive class reported the lowest levels of parental involvement and autonomy support, as well as autonomous reasons for disclosure. Associations between classes and problematic alcohol use were also found, such that the likelihood of problem drinking was greater for adolescents in the Deceptive class. These findings underscore the importance of continued communication of information with both parents and a parenting context that encourages adolescents to talk voluntarily.
Mots-clé
Adolescent disclosure, Secrets, Lies, Parenting, Alcohol use, Latent class analysis
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
14/02/2022 17:02
Dernière modification de la notice
03/08/2022 6:38
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