Impact of Teaching on Surgical Site Infection after Colonic Surgery.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_758C391F79BC
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Impact of Teaching on Surgical Site Infection after Colonic Surgery.
Périodique
Journal of surgical education
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Grass F., Pache B., Petignat C., Moulin E., Hahnloser D., Demartines N., Hübner M.
ISSN
1878-7452 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1878-7452
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
75
Numéro
5
Pages
1287-1291
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The present study aimed to evaluate whether teaching had an influence on surgical site infections (SSI) after colonic surgery.
Colonic surgeries between January 2014 and December 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, surgical details, and SSI rates were compared between teaching procedures vs. experts. Risk factors for SSI were identified by multinominal logistic regression.
SSI were prospectively assessed by an independent National Surveillance Program (www.swissnoso.ch) at Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, a tertiary academic institution.
Included in the present analysis were patients documented in a prospective institutional enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) database and who were prospectively monitored by the independent National Infection Surveillance Committee between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2016.
In all, 315 patients constituted the study cohort. Demographic and surgical items were comparable between teaching (n = 161) vs. expert operations (n = 135) except for higher occurrence of wound contamination class III-IV (13 vs. 19%, p = 0.046) in patients operated by experts. Overall, 61 patients (19%) developed SSI, namely 25 patients (16%) in the teaching group and 32 patients (24%) in the expert group (p = 0.077). Contamination class III-IV (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4-7.5, p = 0.005) and open surgery (OR = 3.4; 95% CI: 1.8-6.7, p < 0.001) were independent risk factors for SSI, while teaching had no significant impact (OR = 0.6; 95% CI: 0.3-1.2, p = 0.153).
Surgical teaching was feasible and safe after colonic surgery in the present cohort and had no impact on SSI rate.
Mots-clé
Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice, colorectal surgery, risk factors, surgical site infection, teaching
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
10/03/2018 11:02
Dernière modification de la notice
25/01/2022 8:10
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