Acceptation of Folk Medicine and its "secrets" in a Swiss Burn Centre.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_6F1E388420AF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Acceptation of Folk Medicine and its "secrets" in a Swiss Burn Centre.
Périodique
Annals of burns and fire disasters
Auteur(s)
Kasser S., Applegate L.A., Hirt-Burri N., Jafari P., de Buys Roessingh A., Raffoul W., Berger M.M.
ISSN
1592-9558 (Print)
ISSN-L
1592-9558
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
30/09/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Numéro
3
Pages
227-233
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In Switzerland 'Secret' is a folk medicine called upon for burns. It has belonged to UNESCO's intangible cultural heritage since 2012. It is supposed to ease pain and accelerate the healing process of burns. As the practice is widely used in the population, this observational study investigated the opinion of caregivers and patients from the National Burn Center of Lausanne. Qualitative observational study based on a survey including ten questions aimed at identifying the professionals' perception of the phenomenon. Questions were developed from repeated encounters in the burn center. Data collection took five months. Thirty-six healthcare professionals (HP) and 12 selected patients (or parents for minors) discharged after burns were interviewed on a voluntary basis: all of the HPs knew about 'Secret' from the workplace, and 26 from home: 33 were convinced that it might be useful and reduce pain. The perceived efficiency of the practice (36 respondents) differs depending on professional category and personal experience. Only one HP considered the practice to be dangerous. The nurses and auxiliary nurses expressed that it should be used more widely. The 12 patients considered it as a complementary step, not a replacement for medical care. Health professionals globally considered this practice safe and helpful. The patients were interested in using parallel approaches and were careful about their expectations. This openness is probably an indication that HPs believe that acceptance of the culture and beliefs of patients and their families might positively affect response to treatment, whatever the burn size.
Mots-clé
burn care, folk medicine, pain management
Pubmed
Création de la notice
25/04/2020 17:50
Dernière modification de la notice
21/05/2020 5:26
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