Prevalence of <i>Anaplasma phagocytophilum</i> and <i>Coxiella burnetii</i> in <i>Ixodes ricinus</i> ticks in Switzerland: an underestimated epidemiologic risk.

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_6BE9445528C8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Prevalence of <i>Anaplasma phagocytophilum</i> and <i>Coxiella burnetii</i> in <i>Ixodes ricinus</i> ticks in Switzerland: an underestimated epidemiologic risk.
Périodique
New microbes and new infections
Auteur(s)
Pilloux L., Baumgartner A., Jaton K., Lienhard R., Ackermann-Gäumann R., Beuret C., Greub G.
ISSN
2052-2975 (Print)
ISSN-L
2052-2975
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Pages
22-26
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Ticks are vectors of several microorganisms responsible for infectious diseases in human and animals, such as <i>Anaplasma phagocytophilum</i> and <i>Coxiella burnetii.</i> In this study, we investigated the prevalence of these two bacteria in 62 889 <i>Ixodes ricinus</i> ticks in selected regions covering all Switzerland. A high prevalence of 11.9% of <i>A. phagocytophilum</i> DNA was observed by real-time PCR on 8534 pools of ticks. This pool prevalence corresponds to an estimated prevalence of 1.71% in individual tick. A total of 144 of the 171 collection sites (84.2%) were positive for the presence of <i>A. phagocytophilum,</i> and these sites were homogenously distributed throughout Switzerland. Such prevalence and geographical distribution underline the risk of human and animal exposure to <i>A. phagocytophilum</i> and highlight the need to assess the epidemiology and clinical diagnosis of human and animal anaplasmosis in Switzerland. However, DNA of <i>C. burnetii</i> was never found in any tick pool. This absence suggests a very low role of <i>I. ricinus</i> ticks as vector and reservoir of <i>C. burnetii</i> in Switzerland, and it supports previous reports demonstrating the role of sheep and goats in the epidemiology of Q fever. However, considering its pathogenic potential, it is necessary to keep monitoring for the possible reemergence of this bacterium in ticks in the future.
Mots-clé
Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Coxiella burnetii, Ixodes ricinus, Q fever, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, ticks
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/01/2019 15:55
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:26
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