Blunt injury to the ascending aorta: three patterns of presentation.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_65997D93FC0F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Blunt injury to the ascending aorta: three patterns of presentation.
Périodique
Surgery
Auteur(s)
Prêtre R., LaHarpe R., Cheretakis A., Kürsteiner K., Khatchatourian G., Didier D., Faidutti B.
ISSN
0039-6060 (Print)
ISSN-L
0039-6060
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1996
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
119
Numéro
6
Pages
603-610
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Injury to the ascending aorta is a rare lesion that may present in various forms. A thorough analysis of this lesion is lacking in the literature. This study was undertaken to delineate the prevalence and modes of presentation of injuries to the ascending aorta after blunt trauma and to suggest guidelines for management.
METHODS: A retrospective analysis of autopsies performed in our department of forensic medicine on blunt trauma victims from 1984 to 1993 and a literature review of autopsy series were undertaken to delineate the prevalence and relevant characteristics of this injury. A cash report from our institution and a review of the literature were used to provide information regarding clinical presentations of this injury and treatment approaches.
RESULTS: Three modes of presentation were encountered. (1) Presentation at autopsy: The prevalence of injury to the ascending aorta after a traffic accident was 2% in our autopsy series. Among 13 patients with this injury 12 had other associated, potentially lethal lesions. A massive hemopericardium was present in two patients only. In autopsy series the incidence of injury to the ascending aorta in patients with an injury to the aorta ranged from 0% to 23%. (2) CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Twenty-one patients were treated surgically and reported in the literature. Fourteen presented with a pseudoaneurysm and seven with a chronic sinus of Valsalva fistula. One patient with a pseudoaneurysm presented with signs of cardiac tamponade and required immediate decompression; the others were hemodynamically stable. Seven patients had a cardiac lesion (valve tear in six and cardiac contusion in one), and three had an arch vessel lesion. Aorta repair was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass in every patient. (3) Incidental presentation: Seven patients with a traumatic tear of the aortic valve presented an incidental lesion of the ascending aorta. It was a subadventitial hematoma in three patients and an intimal and medial tear in four patients. Aortic tears were reinforced by direct suture.
CONCLUSIONS: Injury to the ascending aorta after blunt trauma is rare but lethal mostly from associated injuries. Survivors may appear in stable condition and present mostly with pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta or sinus of Valsalva fistula. Associated lesions to the heart and arch vessels should be looked for. Repair of the ascending aorta injury is performed under cardiopulmonary bypass.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
16/12/2014 18:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:21
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