Fire and people in tropical island grassland landscapes : Fiji and Madagascar

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_6415C11E8D67.P001.pdf (372.59 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_6415C11E8D67
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Fire and people in tropical island grassland landscapes : Fiji and Madagascar
Périodique
The Journal of Pacific Studies
Auteur(s)
Kull Ch. A. 
ISSN
1011-3029
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Pages
121-129
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Little research has focused specifically on fire in Fiji's leeward grass-covered hills and mountains. In this paper, I review what is known about Fiji's grassland fires, what we can surmise from comparison with Madagascar (another frequently burnt tropical island landscape) and what questions deserve further research. Grassy biomes and fire were more common than previously thought in prehuman seasonally dry landscapes; Madagascar and Fiji are no exception. People burn in both places for diverse livelihood reasons, but in particular for pasture management and cropfield preparation. Fires, however, do escape control and damage property, and are also blamed for effects on health, climate and biodiversity. Government regulation of fire is difficult to enforce and often ignored. Given the danger of fuel build-up and the cost of other land management options, continued traditional burning is a realistic future outlook.
Mots-clé
Fiji, fire, Madagascar
Création de la notice
11/03/2015 17:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:20
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