Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms in free-living small mammals in Europe and Afghanistan.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_63A022EA683B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms in free-living small mammals in Europe and Afghanistan.
Périodique
Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Stephan S., Guerra D., Pospischil A., Hilbe M., Weissenböck H., Novotný L., Greub G., Croxatto A., Teifke J.P., Ulrich R.G., Schlegel M., Ruhl S., Schotte U., Binder A., Sauer S., Borel N.
ISSN
1943-3700 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0090-3558
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
50
Numéro
2
Pages
195-204
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Few data are available on the occurrence of chlamydial infections in wild small mammals. We investigated the significance of free-living small mammals as reservoirs or transmission hosts for microorganisms of the phylum/class Chlamydiae. We obtained 3,664 tissue samples from 911 animals in Switzerland, Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, and Afghanistan. Samples included internal organs (n = 3,652) and feces (n = 12) from 679 rodents (order Rodentia) and 232 insectivores (order Soricomorpha) and were tested by three TaqMan® real-time PCRs specific for members of the family Chlamydiaceae and selected Chlamydia-like organisms such as Parachlamydia spp. and Waddlia spp. Only one of 911 (0.11%) animals exhibited a questionable positive result by Chlamydiaceae-specific real-time PCR. Five of 911 animals were positive by specific real-time PCR for Parachlamydia spp. but could not be confirmed by quantitative PCR targeting the Parachlamydia acanthamoebae secY gene (secY qPCR). One of 746 animals (0.13%) was positive by real-time PCR for Waddlia chondrophila. This result was confirmed by Waddlia secY qPCR. This is the first detection of Chlamydia-like organisms in small wildlife in Switzerland. Considering previous negative results for Chlamydiaceae in wild ruminant species from Switzerland, these data suggest that wild small mammals are unlikely to be important carriers or transport hosts for Chamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
20/06/2014 18:35
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:20
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