The Dual Nature of Early-Life Experience on Somatosensory Processing in the Human Infant Brain.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_618FEF7E8238
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
The Dual Nature of Early-Life Experience on Somatosensory Processing in the Human Infant Brain.
Périodique
Current biology
Auteur(s)
Maitre N.L., Key A.P., Chorna O.D., Slaughter J.C., Matusz P.J., Wallace M.T., Murray M.M.
ISSN
1879-0445 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0960-9822
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/04/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
7
Pages
1048-1054
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Every year, 15 million preterm infants are born, and most spend their first weeks in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) [1]. Although essential for the support and survival of these infants, NICU sensory environments are dramatically different from those in which full-term infants mature and thus likely impact the development of functional brain organization [2]. Yet the integrity of sensory systems determines effective perception and behavior [3, 4]. In neonates, touch is a cornerstone of interpersonal interactions and sensory-cognitive development [5-7]. NICU treatments used to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes rely heavily on touch [8]. However, we understand little of how brain maturation at birth (i.e., prematurity) and quality of early-life experiences (e.g., supportive versus painful touch) interact to shape the development of the somatosensory system [9]. Here, we identified the spatial, temporal, and amplitude characteristics of cortical responses to light touch that differentiate them from sham stimuli in full-term infants. We then utilized this data-driven analytical framework to show that the degree of prematurity at birth determines the extent to which brain responses to light touch (but not sham) are attenuated at the time of discharge from the hospital. Building on these results, we showed that, when controlling for prematurity and analgesics, supportive experiences (e.g., breastfeeding, skin-to-skin care) are associated with stronger brain responses, whereas painful experiences (e.g., skin punctures, tube insertions) are associated with reduced brain responses to the same touch stimuli. Our results shed crucial insights into the mechanisms through which common early perinatal experiences may shape the somatosensory scaffolding of later perceptual, cognitive, and social development.
Mots-clé
Brain/physiology, Cohort Studies, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn/physiology, Infant, Premature/physiology, Male, Term Birth, Touch Perception, development, infant, pain, parent, preterm, sensory, tactile, touch
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
28/03/2017 18:10
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:18
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