Physiological handling of dietary fructose-containing sugars: implications for health.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5E8322D7CB9E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Physiological handling of dietary fructose-containing sugars: implications for health.
Périodique
International journal of obesity (2005)
Auteur(s)
Campos V.C., Tappy L.
ISSN
1476-5497 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0307-0565
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
40 Suppl 1
Pages
S6-11
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Fructose has always been present in our diet, but its consumption has increased markedly over the past 200 years. This is mainly due to consumption of sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup in industrial foods and beverages. Unlike glucose, fructose cannot be directly used as an energy source by all cells of the human body and needs first to be converted into glucose, lactate or fatty acids in the liver, intestine and kidney. Because of this specific two-step metabolism, some energy is consumed in splanchnic organs to convert fructose into other substrates, resulting in a lower net energy efficiency of fructose compared with glucose. A high intake of fructose-containing sugars is associated with body weight gain in large cohort studies, and fructose can certainly contribute to energy imbalance leading to obesity. Whether fructose-containing foods promote obesity more than other energy-dense foods remains controversial, however. A short-term (days-weeks) high-fructose intake is not associated with an increased fasting glycemia nor to an impaired insulin-mediated glucose transport in healthy subjects. It, however, increases hepatic glucose production, basal and postprandial blood triglyceride concentrations and intrahepatic fat content. Whether these metabolic alterations are early markers of metabolic dysfunction or merely adaptations to the specific two-step fructose metabolism remain unknown.

Mots-clé
Beverages/adverse effects, Diet/adverse effects, Energy Metabolism, Fatty Liver/etiology, Fatty Liver/metabolism, Fatty Liver/prevention & control, Fructose/adverse effects, Humans, Inflammation/etiology, Inflammation/metabolism, Inflammation/prevention & control, Lipid Metabolism, Liver/metabolism, Metabolic Syndrome X/etiology, Metabolic Syndrome X/metabolism, Metabolic Syndrome X/prevention & control, Obesity/etiology, Obesity/metabolism, Obesity/prevention & control, Sweetening Agents/adverse effects, Weight Gain
Pubmed
Création de la notice
29/03/2016 13:40
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:16
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