Eight-year longitudinal changes in body composition in healthy Swiss adults

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5D1BD7B1304B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Eight-year longitudinal changes in body composition in healthy Swiss adults
Périodique
Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Auteur(s)
Kyle  U. G., Melzer  K., Kayser  B., Picard-Kossovsky  M., Gremion  G., Pichard  C.
ISSN
0731-5724 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2006
Volume
25
Numéro
6
Pages
493-501
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Dec
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Significant changes in body composition occur during lifetime. This longitudinal study (8.0 +/- 0.8 yrs) in a cohort of healthy sedentary and physically active men (n = 78) and women (n = 53), aged 20 to 74 yr describes: 1) the longitudinal changes in weight and body composition and 2) their associations with age and physical activity. Method: Fat-free mass (FFM) and body fat (BF) were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Subjects who regularly performed >3 hours per week of endurance type physical activity were classified as "Active". Others were classified as "Sedentary". Subjects were also separated by age (<45 yr vs > or =45 yr). RESULTS: FFM increased by 1.7 +/- 2.8 kg in men <45 yr who gained 4.0 +/- 5.0 kg of body weight and was maintained (0.5 +/- 1.6 kg) in women <45 y who gained 1.6 +/- 3.0 kg of weight. A weight gain of 1.2 +/- 3.3 kg in men > or =45 yr was accompanied by stable FFM (-0.1 +/- 2.3 kg), and of 1.0 +/- 3.2 kg was accompanied by a loss of FFM in women > or =45 yr. In active men > or =45 yr, maintenance of FFM was associated with smaller weight gains than in sedentary; sedentary men > or =45 yr decreased FFM with larger weight gains than active subjects. Sedentary women <45 yr were able to gain FFM; the active women maintained, but did not gain FFM with smaller weight gains than in sedentary women. FFM decreased in >/=45 yr women despite of small weight gains. CONCLUSION: Weight change is clearly associated with a change in FFM. Weight gain is necessary to offset age-related FFM loss between 20 and 74 yrs. In active men, a FFM increase was associated with less weight gain than sedentary men. Future studies should evaluate the threshold of weight change and the level of physical activity necessary to prevent age-related losses of FFM.
Mots-clé
Adipose Tissue/*metabolism Adult Age Factors Aged Aging/*physiology Body Composition/*physiology Body Weight/*physiology Cohort Studies Electric Impedance Exercise/*physiology Female Humans Longitudinal Studies Male Middle Aged Muscle, Skeletal/*metabolism Questionnaires Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
28/01/2008 12:17
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:15
Données d'usage