God, Fatherland, Home: Revealing the Dark Side of Our Anthropological Virtue

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_5CFB3D500B72
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
God, Fatherland, Home: Revealing the Dark Side of Our Anthropological Virtue
Périodique
Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
Auteur(s)
Goodale M.
ISSN
1359-0987 (print)
1467-9655 (electronic)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/06/2020
Volume
26
Numéro
2
Pages
343-364
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The article uses ethnographic research on right‐wing anti‐government movements in Bolivia conducted at the height of social conflict and cultural violence in 2008 and 2009 to reflect more generally on the relationship between anthropological research, ethical commitment, and the politics of knowledge. The article first describes the relevant epistemological and political contexts in which engaged anthropology emerged as an important disciplinary current. It then goes on to consider how and why the author's research on right‐wing political practice in Bolivia diverged from the disciplinary expectations of engaged anthropology. After reflecting on the implications of this shift, the article concludes by arguing for a methodological recalibration that allows anthropologists to take seriously the ideologies and cultural logics of contemporary right‐wing mobilization, particularly social and political movements that are animated by what Edmund Burke described as ‘just prejudice’.
Création de la notice
18/02/2021 15:51
Dernière modification de la notice
24/02/2021 7:24
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