Opportunity for catch-up HPV vaccination in young women after first delivery.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5C7E2229728A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Opportunity for catch-up HPV vaccination in young women after first delivery.
Périodique
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Auteur(s)
Rama C.H., Villa L.L., Pagliusi S., Andreoli M.A., Costa M.C., Thomann P., Alves V.A., Longatto-Filho A., Eluf-Neto J.
ISSN
1470-2738[electronic], 0143-005X[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Volume
64
Numéro
7
Pages
610-615
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Background Early age at first delivery has been identified as a risk factor for high-risk HPV-type infection and cervical cancer development.
Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in a large public maternity hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. During June 2006 to February 2007, 301 women aged 15-24 years who gave birth to their first child were recruited between 43 and 60 days after delivery. Detection of HPV DNA in cervical specimens was performed using a standardised PCR protocol with PGMY09/11 primers. The association of selected factors with HPV infection was assessed by using a Generalised Linear Model.
Results HPV DNA was detected in 58.5% (95% CI 52.7% to 64.0%) of the enrolled young women. The most common types of HPV found were: HPV16, HPV51, HPV52, HPV58 and HPV71. The overall prevalence of HPV types targeted by the HPV prophylactic vaccines was: HPV 16-12.0%, HPV 18-2.3% and HPV 6 and 11 4.3%. In the multivariate analysis, only age (inversely, p for trend=0.02) and smoking habits were independently associated with HPV infection.
Conclusions The findings show that these young primiparous women had high cervical HPV prevalence, suggesting that this is a high-risk group for cervical cancer development. Nevertheless, 17.3% were positive for any of the four HPV types included in HPV vaccines (HPV6, 11, 16 or 18), with 13.3% positive for HPV 16 or 18 and only 1.0% having both vaccine related-oncogenic HPV types. Thus, young primiparous women could benefit from catch-up HPV vaccination programmes.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
03/02/2011 12:20
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:14
Données d'usage