Temporo-parietal cortex encodes location of the self: joining fMRI with neuroscience robotics to study bodily self-consciousness

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5C6CA7183FF1
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Temporo-parietal cortex encodes location of the self: joining fMRI with neuroscience robotics to study bodily self-consciousness
Titre de la conférence
33rd European Conference on Visual Perception
Auteur(s)
Ionta S., Lenggenhager B., Mouthon M., Fornari E., Chapuis D., Gassert R., Blanke O.
Adresse
Lausanne, Switzerland, August 22-26, 2010
ISBN
0301-0066
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
39
Série
Perception
Pages
135-136
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication type : Meeting Abstract
Résumé
Neuroimaging of the self has focused on high-level mechanisms such as language, memory or imagery of the self and implicated widely distributed brain networks. Yet recent evidence suggests that low-level mechanisms such as multisensory and sensorimotor integration may play a fundamental role in self-related processing. In the present study we used visuotactile multisensory conflict, robotics, virtual reality, and fMRI to study such low-level mechanisms by experimentally inducing changes in self-location. Participants saw a video of a person's back (body) or an empty room (no-body) being stroked while a MR-compatible robotic device stroked their back. The latter tactile input was synchronous or asynchronous with respect to the seen stroking. Self-location was estimated behaviorally confirming previous data that self-location only differed between the two body conditions. fMRI results showed a bilateral activation of the temporo-parietal cortex with a significantly higher BOLD signal increase in the synchronous/body condition with respect to the other conditions. Sensorimotor cortex and extrastriate-body-area were also activated. We argue that temporo-parietal activity reflects the experience of the conscious 'I' as embodied and localized within bodily space, compatible with clinical data in neurological patients with out-of-body experiences.
Mots-clé
,
Web of science
Création de la notice
30/05/2011 11:34
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:14
Données d'usage