Combined impact of negative lifestyle factors on cardiovascular risk in children: a randomized prospective study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5C614F455175
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Combined impact of negative lifestyle factors on cardiovascular risk in children: a randomized prospective study.
Périodique
Journal of Adolescent Health
Auteur(s)
Meyer U., Schindler C., Bloesch T., Schmocker E., Zahner L., Puder J.J., Kriemler S.
ISSN
1879-1972 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1054-139X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
55
Numéro
6
Pages
790-795
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
PURPOSE: Negative lifestyle factors are known to be associated with increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) in children, but research on their combined impact on a general population of children is sparse. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the combined impact of easily assessable negative lifestyle factors on the CVR scores of randomly selected children after 4 years.
METHODS: Of the 540 randomly selected 6- to 13-year-old children, 502 children participated in a baseline health assessment, and 64% were assessed again after 4 years. Measures included anthropometry, fasting blood samples, and a health assessment questionnaire. Participants scored one point for each negative lifestyle factor at baseline: overweight; physical inactivity; high media consumption; little outdoor time; skipping breakfast; and having a parent who has ever smoked, is inactive, or overweight. A CVR score at follow-up was constructed by averaging sex- and age-related z-scores of waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, inverted high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides.
RESULTS: The age-, sex-, pubertal stage-, and social class-adjusted probabilities (95% confidence interval) for being in the highest CVR score tertile at follow-up for children who had at most one (n = 48), two (n = 64), three (n = 56), four (n = 41), or five or more (n = 14) risky lifestyle factors were 15.4% (8.9-25.3), 24.3% (17.4-32.8), 36.0% (28.6-44.2), 49.8% (38.6-61.0), and 63.5% (47.2-77.2), respectively.
CONCLUSIONS: Even in childhood, an accumulation of negative lifestyle factors is associated with higher CVR scores after 4 years. These negative lifestyle factors are easy to assess in clinical practice and allow early detection and prevention of CVR in childhood.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
27/12/2014 10:22
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:14
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