Stimulated sweating as a therapy to reduce interdialytic weight gain and improve potassium balance in chronic hemodialysis patients: a pilot study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5A9573BEE163
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Stimulated sweating as a therapy to reduce interdialytic weight gain and improve potassium balance in chronic hemodialysis patients: a pilot study.
Périodique
Hemodialysis International.
Auteur(s)
Pruijm M., El-Housseini Y., Mahfoudh H., Jarraya F., Hachicha J., Teta D., Burnier M.
ISSN
1542-4758 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1492-7535
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
17
Numéro
2
Pages
240-248
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Controlling the extracellular volume in hemodialysis patients is a difficult task. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of different methods of stimulated sweating to reduce mean interdialytic weight gain (IWG), to improve blood pressure regulation, and potassium/urea balance. Two center, crossover pilot study. In Lausanne, hemodialysis patients took four hot-water baths a week, 30 minutes each, on nondialysis days during 1 month. In Sfax, patients visited the local Hammam Center four times a week. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded, and weekly laboratory analysis was performed. Results were compared with a preceding 1-month control period. In Lausanne, five patients (all men, median age 55 years) participated. Bathing temperature was (mean ± standard deviation) 41.2 ± 3°C and sweating-induced weight loss 600 ± 500 g. Mean IWG (control vs. intervention period) decreased from 2.3 ± 0.9 to 1.8 ± 1 kg (P = 0.004), Systolic blood pressure from 139 ± 21 to 136 ± 22 mmHg (P = 0.4), and diastolic blood pressure form 79 ± 12 to 75 ± 13 mmHg (P = 0.08); antihypertensive therapy could be reduced from 2.8 ± 0.4 to 1.9 ± 0.5 antihypertensive drugs per patient (P = 0.01). In Sfax (n = 9, median age 46 years), weight loss per Hammam session was 420 ± 100 g. No differences were found in IWG or BP, but predialysis serum potassium level decreased from 5.9 ± 0.8 to 5.5 ± 0.9 mmol/L (P = 0.04) and urea from 26.9 ± 6 to 23.1 ± 6 mmol/L (P = 0.02). Hot-water baths appear to be a safe way to reduce IWG in selected hemodialysis patients. Hammam visits reduce serum potassium and urea levels, but not IWG. More data in larger patient groups are necessary before definite conclusion can be drawn.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
05/02/2013 16:33
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:13
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