Personality traits and virtual reality performance.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5A76C1CB8932
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Personality traits and virtual reality performance.
Périodique
Surgical Endoscopy
Auteur(s)
Rosenthal R., Schäfer J., Hoffmann H., Vitz M., Oertli D., Hahnloser D.
ISSN
1432-2218 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0930-2794
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
1
Pages
222-230
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Surgeons' personalities have been described as different from those of the general population, but this was based on small descriptive studies limited by the choice of evaluation instrument. Furthermore, although the importance of the human factor in team performance has been recognized, the effect of personality traits on technical performance is unknown. This study aimed to compare surgical residents' personality traits with those of the general population and to evaluate whether an association exists between their personality traits and technical performance using a virtual reality (VR) laparoscopy simulator.
METHODS: In this study, 95 participants (54 residents with basic, 29 with intermediate laparoscopic experience, and 12 students) underwent personality assessment using the NEO-Five Factor Inventory and performed five VR tasks of the Lap Mentor? basic tasks module. The residents' personality traits were compared with those of the general population, and the association between VR performance and personality traits was investigated.
RESULTS: Surgical residents showed personality traits different from those of the general population, demonstrating lower neuroticism, higher extraversion and conscientiousness, and male residents showed greater openness. In the multivariable analysis, adjusted for gender and surgical experience, none of the personality traits was found to be an independent predictor of technical performance.
CONCLUSIONS: Surgical residents present distinct personality traits that differ from those of the general population. These traits were not found to be associated with technical performance in a virtual environment. The traits may, however, play an important role in team performance, which in turn is highly relevant for optimal surgical performance.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
31/01/2013 19:09
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:13
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