Infection dynamics on spatial small-world network models

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_589E9D9FFB92
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Infection dynamics on spatial small-world network models
Périodique
Physical Review E
Auteur(s)
Iotti B., Antonioni A., Bullock S., Darabos C., Tomassini M., Giacobini M.
ISSN
2470-0045
2470-0053
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
30/11/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
96
Numéro
5
Pages
NA
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The study of complex networks, and in particular of social networks, has mostly concentrated on relational networks, abstracting the distance between nodes. Spatial networks are, however, extremely relevant in our daily lives, and a large body of research exists to show that the distances between nodes greatly influence the cost and probability of establishing and maintaining a link. A random geometric graph (RGG) is the main type of synthetic network model used to mimic the statistical properties and behavior of many social networks. We propose a model, called REDS, that extends energy-constrained RGGs to account for the synergic effect of sharing the cost of a link with our neighbors, as is observed in real relational networks. We apply both the standard Watts-Strogatz rewiring procedure and another method that conserves the degree distribution of the network. The second technique was developed to eliminate unwanted forms of spatial correlation between the degree of nodes that are affected by rewiring, limiting the effect on other properties such as clustering and assortativity. We analyze both the statistical properties of these two network types and their epidemiological behavior when used as a substrate for a standard susceptible-infected-susceptible compartmental model. We consider and discuss the differences in properties and behavior between RGGs and REDS as rewiring increases and as infection parameters are changed. We report considerable differences both between the network types and, in the case of REDS, between the two rewiring schemes. We conclude that REDS represent, with the application of these rewiring mechanisms, extremely useful and interesting tools in the study of social and epidemiological phenomena in synthetic complex networks.
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/01/2018 14:13
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:12
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