Variability of the relative afferent pupillary defect.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_57C7F1417D2B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Variability of the relative afferent pupillary defect.
Périodique
American journal of ophthalmology
Auteur(s)
Kawasaki A., Moore P., Kardon R.H.
ISSN
0002-9394
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1995
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
120
Numéro
5
Pages
622-33
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
PURPOSE: Afferent asymmetry of visual function is detectable in both normal and pathologic conditions. With a computerized test, we assessed the variability in measuring afferent asymmetry of the pupillary light reflex, that is, the relative afferent pupillary defect. METHODS: In ten normal subjects, pupillary responses to an alternating light stimulus were recorded with computerized infrared pupillography. The relative afferent pupillary defect for each test was determined by using a new computer analysis. The 95% confidence interval of each determination of relative afferent pupillary defect was used to represent the short-term fluctuation in its measurement. To optimize the test for clinical use, we studied the influence of stimulus intensity, duration, and number on the variability of the relative afferent pupillary defect. RESULTS: When the relative afferent pupillary defect was based on only a few light alternations (stimulus pairs), there was excessive variability in its measurement (95% confidence interval > 0.5 log units). With approximately 200 stimulus pairs, the 95% confidence interval was reduced to less than 0.1 log unit (relative afferent pupillary defect +/- 0.05 log unit). Also, there was less variability when the dark interval between alternating light stimulation was less than one second. CONCLUSIONS: Computerized infrared pupillography can standardize the alternating light test and minimize the error in quantifying a relative afferent pupillary defect. A reproducible relative afferent pupillary defect measurement is desirable for defining afferent injury and following the course of disease.
Mots-clé
Adult, Afferent Pathways/physiopathology, Computer Systems, Female, Humans, Male, Ophthalmology/instrumentation, Photic Stimulation, Pupil Disorders/physiopathology, Reflex, Pupillary/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
23/11/2009 23:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:11
Données d'usage