BrainCheck - a very brief tool to detect incipient cognitive decline: optimized case-finding combining patient- and informant-based data.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_5742233CA5CB.P001.pdf (1047.92 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_5742233CA5CB
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
BrainCheck - a very brief tool to detect incipient cognitive decline: optimized case-finding combining patient- and informant-based data.
Périodique
Alzheimer's Research and Therapy
Auteur(s)
Ehrensperger M.M., Taylor K.I., Berres M., Foldi N.S., Dellenbach M., Bopp I., Gold G., von Gunten A., Inglin D., Müri R., Rüegger B., Kressig R.W., Monsch A.U.
ISSN
1758-9193 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
6
Numéro
9
Pages
69
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: JOURNAL ARTICLE Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
INTRODUCTION: Optimal identification of subtle cognitive impairment in the primary care setting requires a very brief tool combining (a) patients' subjective impairments, (b) cognitive testing, and (c) information from informants. The present study developed a new, very quick and easily administered case-finding tool combining these assessments ('BrainCheck') and tested the feasibility and validity of this instrument in two independent studies.
METHODS: We developed a case-finding tool comprised of patient-directed (a) questions about memory and depression and (b) clock drawing, and (c) the informant-directed 7-item version of the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Feasibility study: 52 general practitioners rated the feasibility and acceptance of the patient-directed tool. Validation study: An independent group of 288 Memory Clinic patients (mean ± SD age = 76.6 ± 7.9, education = 12.0 ± 2.6; 53.8% female) with diagnoses of mild cognitive impairment (n = 80), probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 185), or major depression (n = 23) and 126 demographically matched, cognitively healthy volunteer participants (age = 75.2 ± 8.8, education = 12.5 ± 2.7; 40% female) partook. All patient and healthy control participants were administered the patient-directed tool, and informants of 113 patient and 70 healthy control participants completed the very short IQCODE.
RESULTS: Feasibility study: General practitioners rated the patient-directed tool as highly feasible and acceptable. Validation study: A Classification and Regression Tree analysis generated an algorithm to categorize patient-directed data which resulted in a correct classification rate (CCR) of 81.2% (sensitivity = 83.0%, specificity = 79.4%). Critically, the CCR of the combined patient- and informant-directed instruments (BrainCheck) reached nearly 90% (that is 89.4%; sensitivity = 97.4%, specificity = 81.6%).
CONCLUSION: A new and very brief instrument for general practitioners, 'BrainCheck', combined three sources of information deemed critical for effective case-finding (that is, patients' subject impairments, cognitive testing, informant information) and resulted in a nearly 90% CCR. Thus, it provides a very efficient and valid tool to aid general practitioners in deciding whether patients with suspected cognitive impairments should be further evaluated or not ('watchful waiting').
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
02/12/2014 15:55
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:11
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