Melanoma vaccines

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_554D0E83531E
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Melanoma vaccines
Titre du livre
Targeted Therapeutics in Melanoma
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Romero P., Speiser D.E.
Editeur
Springer
Lieu d'édition
New York
ISBN
978-1-61779-406-3
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Editeur⸱rice scientifique
Gajewski T.F., Hodi F.S.
Série
Current clinical oncology
Pages
207-232
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Many vaccines have been very successful. They can protect from many different infectious diseases, and thus contribute enormously to public health. The majority of successful vaccines induce neutralizing antibodies, which are essential for protection from disease, by the inhibition of microbe invasion and spread through the body, via extracellular compartments, or by neutralization of toxins. In contrast to infectious diseases, the pathological process in cancer is primarily intracellular. Immunity to cancer depends mainly on T cells which are capable of identifying and eliminating abnormal cells, via recognition of peptide antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules at the cell surface. In some instances, tumor-specific antibodies can contribute to immune defense against cancer. Unfortunately, for many solid tumors (including melanoma), this mechanism is insufficient. Nevertheless, the search for cancer-neutralizing antibodies continues, similar to, e.g., HIV neutralizing antibodies. In this chapter, we focus on the development of T cell vaccines, a great challenge but also a promising approach as a new therapy for melanoma, other cancers, and intracellular pathogens
Web of science
Création de la notice
23/01/2013 15:39
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:09
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