La contribution de Friedrich Wilhelm Zahn (1845-1904) à l'étude de l'inflammation [Contribution of Friedrich Wilhelm Zahn (1845-1904) to the study of inflammation]

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5475038BA76E
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
La contribution de Friedrich Wilhelm Zahn (1845-1904) à l'étude de l'inflammation [Contribution of Friedrich Wilhelm Zahn (1845-1904) to the study of inflammation]
Périodique
Gesnerus
Auteur(s)
Benaroyo  L.
ISSN
0016-9161 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1991
Volume
49 Pt 3-4
Pages
395-408
Notes
DA - 19920622
LA - fre
PT - Biography
PT - English Abstract
PT - Historical Article
PT - Journal Article
Titre original : La contribution de Friedrich Wilhelm Zahn (1845-1904) a l'etude de l'inflammation
SB - IM
SB - Q
Résumé
Prior to being named to the first chair of Pathology at Geneva University, Friedrich Wilhelm Zahn had published, in 1871, his doctoral thesis entitled Zur Lehre von der Entzundung und Eiterung. This work, written under the direction of Edwin Klebs, at Berne, demonstrated experimentally that the so-called Microsporon septicum (an infectious fungus identified by Klebs) provoked a local inflammation as well as remote secondary focal suppurations. This study apparently confirmed Kleb's hypothesis that Microsporon septicum, usually present in wounds, is the cause of an infectious disease. Zahn's research as well as the work of Klebs fell under attack: the method of identifying the microorganism as well as the demonstration of his causal relationship to inflammation were not conclusive. At the end of the discussion, it was admitted that the status of a cause of infection could be attributed to a microorganism only under the two following conditions: the latter must be identified with Koch's method, and his causal relationship to the infectious disease must be specific. This is precisely what Zahn's thesis was unable to prove. The analysis of his work as well as of the critical arguments enables us to follow and understand the controversy on the cause of inflammation and suppuration at the dawn of the bacteriological age
Mots-clé
History,19th Century/History,20th Century/Humans/Inflammation/history/Suppuration/Switzerland
Pubmed
Création de la notice
18/02/2008 17:04
Dernière modification de la notice
03/12/2020 11:39
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