Can oxidative damage be treated nutritionally?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_4BEDE617D721
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Can oxidative damage be treated nutritionally?
Périodique
Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland)
Auteur(s)
Berger M.M.
ISSN
0261-5614
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2005
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
24
Numéro
2
Pages
172-83
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review - Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nutrition and dietary patterns have been shown to have direct impact on health of the population and of selected patient groups. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the reduction of oxidative damage caused by the normal or excessive free radical production. The papers aims at collecting evidence of successful supplementation strategies. METHODS: Review of the literature reporting on antioxidant supplementation trials in the general population and critically ill patients. RESULTS: Antioxidant vitamin and trace element intakes have been shown to be particularly important in the prevention of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, age related ocular diseases and in aging. In animal models, targeted interventions have been associated with reduction of tissue destruction is brain and myocardium ischemia-reperfusion models. In the critically ill antioxidant supplements have resulted in reduction of organ failure and of infectious complications. CONCLUSIONS: Antioxidant micronutrients have beneficial effects in defined models and pathologies, in the general population and in critical illness: ongoing research encourages this supportive therapeutic approach. Further research is required to determined the optimal micronutrient combinations and the doses required according to timing of intervention.
Mots-clé
Animals, Antioxidants, Critical Illness, Dietary Supplements, Disease Models, Animal, Evidence-Based Medicine, Free Radicals, Humans, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Trace Elements, Treatment Outcome, Vitamins
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
21/01/2008 17:30
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:00
Données d'usage