Advanced technological tools to study multidrug resistance in cancer.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_4956D7F37617
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Advanced technological tools to study multidrug resistance in cancer.
Périodique
Drug resistance updates
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Andrei L., Kasas S., Ochoa Garrido I., Stanković T., Suárez Korsnes M., Vaclavikova R., Assaraf Y.G., Pešić M.
ISSN
1532-2084 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1368-7646
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
48
Pages
100658
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The complexity of cancer biology and its clinical manifestation are driven by genetic, epigenetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic alterations, supported by genomic instability as well as by environmental conditions and lifestyle factors. Although novel therapeutic modalities are being introduced, efficacious cancer therapy is not achieved due to the frequent emergence of distinct mechanisms of multidrug resistance (MDR). Advanced technologies with the potential to identify and characterize cancer MDR could aid in selecting the most efficacious therapeutic regimens and prevent inappropriate treatments of cancer patients. Herein, we aim to present technological tools that will enhance our ability to surmount drug resistance in cancer in the upcoming decade. Some of these tools are already in practice such as next-generation sequencing. Identification of genes and different types of RNAs contributing to the MDR phenotype, as well as their molecular targets, are of paramount importance for the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed to enhance drug response in resistant tumors. Other techniques known for many decades are in the process of adaptation and improvement to study cancer cells' characteristics and biological behavior including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and live-cell imaging. AFM can monitor in real-time single molecules or molecular complexes as well as structural alterations occurring in cancer cells induced upon treatment with various antitumor agents. Cell tracking methodologies and software tools recently progressed towards quantitative analysis of the spatio-temporal dynamics of heterogeneous cancer cell populations and enabled direct monitoring of cells and their descendants in 3D cultures. Besides, novel 3D systems with the advanced mimicking of the in vivo tumor microenvironment are applicable to study different cancer biology phenotypes, particularly drug-resistant and aggressive ones. They are also suitable for investigating new anticancer treatment modalities. The ultimate goal of using phenotype-driven 3D cultures for the investigation of patient biopsies as the most appropriate in vivo mimicking model, can be achieved in the near future.
Mots-clé
Animals, Biotechnology/methods, Cell Culture Techniques/methods, Drug Resistance, Multiple/genetics, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/genetics, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods, Humans, Microscopy, Atomic Force/methods, Neoplasms/genetics, Neoplasms/pathology, Tumor Microenvironment/genetics, 3D cultures, Atomic force microscopy, Cancer multidrug resistance, Microfluidic devices, Next-generation sequencing, Single live-cell tracking
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
08/11/2019 0:19
Dernière modification de la notice
04/02/2021 7:25
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