Blood lactose after dairy product intake in healthy men.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_45226C6B180A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Blood lactose after dairy product intake in healthy men.
Périodique
The British journal of nutrition
Auteur(s)
Pimentel G., Burton K.J., Rosikiewicz M., Freiburghaus C., von Ah U., Münger L.H., Pralong F.P., Vionnet N., Greub G., Badertscher R., Vergères G.
ISSN
1475-2662 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0007-1145
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
118
Numéro
12
Pages
1070-1077
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The absence of a dedicated transport for disaccharides in the intestine implicates that the metabolic use of dietary lactose relies on its prior hydrolysis at the intestinal brush border. Consequently, lactose in blood or urine has mostly been associated with specific cases in which the gastrointestinal barrier is damaged. On the other hand, lactose appears in the blood of lactating women and has been detected in the blood and urine of healthy men, indicating that the presence of lactose in the circulation of healthy subjects is not incompatible with normal physiology. In this cross-over study we have characterised the postprandial kinetics of lactose, and its major constituent, galactose, in the serum of fourteen healthy men who consumed a unique dose of 800 g milk or yogurt. Genetic testing for lactase persistence and microbiota profiling of the subjects were also performed. Data revealed that lactose does appear in serum after dairy intake, although with delayed kinetics compared with galactose. Median serum concentrations of approximately 0·02 mmol/l lactose and approximately 0·2 mmol/l galactose were observed after the ingestion of milk and yogurt respectively. The serum concentrations of lactose were inversely correlated with the concentrations of galactose, and the variability observed between the subjects' responses could not be explained by the presence of the lactase persistence allele. Finally, lactose levels have been associated with the abundance of the Veillonella genus in faecal microbiota. The measurement of systemic lactose following dietary intake could provide information about lactose metabolism and nutrient transport processes under normal or pathological conditions.

Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Alleles, Animals, Cross-Over Studies, Diet, Double-Blind Method, Feces/microbiology, Galactose/blood, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Intestines/metabolism, Intestines/microbiology, Lactose/blood, Male, Milk, Postprandial Period, Veillonella/isolation & purification, Yogurt, Young Adult, beta-Galactosidase/genetics, beta-Galactosidase/metabolism, Veillonella, FDR false discovery rate, Intestinal permeability, Lactosaemia
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
07/12/2017 21:33
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:49
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