Alcohol consumption and social inequality at the individual and country levels--results from an international study.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: serval:BIB_43AE1E67CDA0.P001 (431.20 [Ko])
Etat: Public
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Licence: Non spécifiée
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ID Serval
serval:BIB_43AE1E67CDA0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Alcohol consumption and social inequality at the individual and country levels--results from an international study.
Périodique
European Journal of Public Health
Auteur(s)
Grittner U., Kuntsche S., Gmel G., Bloomfield K.
ISSN
1464-360X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1101-1262
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
23
Numéro
2
Pages
332-339
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: International comparisons of social inequalities in alcohol use have not been extensively investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of country-level characteristics and individual socio-economic status (SES) on individual alcohol consumption in 33 countries.
METHODS: Data on 101,525 men and women collected by cross-sectional surveys in 33 countries of the GENACIS study were used. Individual SES was measured by highest attained educational level. Alcohol use measures included drinking status and monthly risky single occasion drinking (RSOD). The relationship between individuals' education and drinking indicators was examined by meta-analysis. In a second step the individual level data and country data were combined and tested in multilevel models. As country level indicators we used the Purchasing Power Parity of the gross national income, the Gini coefficient and the Gender Gap Index.
RESULTS: For both genders and all countries higher individual SES was positively associated with drinking status. Also higher country level SES was associated with higher proportions of drinkers. Lower SES was associated with RSOD among men. Women of higher SES in low income countries were more often RSO drinkers than women of lower SES. The opposite was true in higher income countries.
CONCLUSION: For the most part, findings regarding SES and drinking in higher income countries were as expected. However, women of higher SES in low and middle income countries appear at higher risk of engaging in RSOD. This finding should be kept in mind when developing new policy and prevention initiatives.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/06/2013 18:17
Dernière modification de la notice
01/10/2019 7:17
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