A simple genetic basis of adaptation to a novel thermal environment results in complex metabolic rewiring in Drosophila.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: s13059-018-1503-4.pdf (1519.20 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_4371F6038204
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Etude de cas (case report): rapporte une observation et la commente brièvement.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
A simple genetic basis of adaptation to a novel thermal environment results in complex metabolic rewiring in Drosophila.
Périodique
Genome biology
Auteur(s)
Mallard F., Nolte V., Tobler R., Kapun M., Schlötterer C.
ISSN
1474-760X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1474-7596
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
20/08/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Numéro
1
Pages
119
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Population genetic theory predicts that rapid adaptation is largely driven by complex traits encoded by many loci of small effect. Because large-effect loci are quickly fixed in natural populations, they should not contribute much to rapid adaptation.
To investigate the genetic architecture of thermal adaptation - a highly complex trait - we performed experimental evolution on a natural Drosophila simulans population. Transcriptome and respiration measurements reveal extensive metabolic rewiring after only approximately 60 generations in a hot environment. Analysis of genome-wide polymorphisms identifies two interacting selection targets, Sestrin and SNF4Aγ, pointing to AMPK, a central metabolic switch, as a key factor for thermal adaptation.
Our results demonstrate that large-effect loci segregating at intermediate allele frequencies can allow natural populations to rapidly respond to selection. Because SNF4Aγ also exhibits clinal variation in various Drosophila species, we suggest that this large-effect polymorphism is maintained by temporal and spatial temperature variation in natural environments.
Mots-clé
Adaptation, Physiological/genetics, Animals, Australia, Drosophila/genetics, Drosophila/metabolism, Drosophila Proteins/genetics, Female, Genetic Loci, Genome, Insect, North America, Phenotype, Temperature, Evolve and resequence, Experimental evolution, Pool-Seq, RNASeq, Thermal adaptation
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
29/08/2018 16:11
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:47
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