Influence of deep sternal wound infection on long-term survival after cardiac surgery.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_42183842A733.P001.pdf (402.61 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_42183842A733
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Influence of deep sternal wound infection on long-term survival after cardiac surgery.
Périodique
Medical Science Monitor
Auteur(s)
Colombier S., Kessler U., Ferrari E., von Segesser L.K., Berdajs D.A.
ISSN
1643-3750 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1234-1010
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Pages
668-673
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: epublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the influence of deep sternal wound infection on long-term survival following cardiac surgery.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: In our institutional database we retrospectively evaluated medical records of 4732 adult patients who received open-heart surgery from January 1995 through December 2005. The predictive factors for DSWI were determined using logistic regression analysis. Then, each patient with deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) was matched with 2 controls without DSWI, according to the risk factors identified previously. After checking balance resulting from matching, short-term mortality was compared between groups using a paired test, and long-term survival was compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and a Cox proportional hazard model.
RESULTS: Overall, 4732 records were analyzed. The mean age of the investigated population was 69.3±12.8 years. DSWI occurred in 74 (1.56%) patients. Significant independent predictive factors for deep sternal infections were active smoking (OR 2.19, CI95 1.35-3.53, p=0.001), obesity (OR 1.96, CI95 1.20-3.21, p=0.007), and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (OR 2.09, CI95 1.05-10.06, p=0.016). Mean follow-up in the matched set was 125 months, IQR 99-162. After matching, in-hospital mortality was higher in the DSWI group (8.1% vs. 2.7% p=0.03), but DSWI was not an independent predictor of long-term survival (adjusted HR 1.5, CI95 0.7-3.2, p=0.33).
CONCLUSIONS: The results presented in this report clearly show that post-sternotomy deep wound infection does not influence long-term survival in an adult general cardio-surgical patient population.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/09/2013 10:17
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:43
Données d'usage