Effect of a pilot gait and balance training program: The importance of fear of falling.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_38658
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Effect of a pilot gait and balance training program: The importance of fear of falling.
Titre de la conférence
Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Geriatrics Society
Auteur(s)
Rochat S., Martin E., Aminian K., Thomi M., Besson V., Nadjafi B., Piot-Ziegler C., Büla CJ.
Adresse
Orlando, Florida, May 11-15, 2005
ISBN
1424-4977
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2005
Volume
53
Série
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Pages
S195-S196
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication type : Meeting Abstract
Résumé
Purpose: To determine the evolution of fear of falling, and its relationship
with gait performance after a 10-week gait and balance training
program.
Population and methods: Participants (N=50) were community-dwelling elderly persons
enrolled voluntarily in a 10-week, low intensity, gait and balance
training program. At baseline, fear of falling was assessed using a previously
validated version of Tinetti's Fall Efficacy Scale (FES, range
0-120, higher score indicating higher confidence), that assesses one's
confidence in performing 12 activities of daily life without falling.
Gait parameters were measured over a 20m walk at preferred gait
speed, using the Physilog system (Aminian K, et al., J Biomechanics,
2002). This system uses 4 kinematics sensors attached to the lower
limbs and a data logger carried by the subject. Follow-up data on fear
of falling and gait were collected one week after completion of the
program.
Results: Overall, 43 (86%) of the participants completed the program.
Mean age was 78.1 years, 79% were women. At baseline, mean FES
score was 98.8 (range 58-120) and mean gait speed was 0.92 m/sec
(range 0.43-1.47). At follow-up, participants modestly improved their
FES score (98.8±17.0 vs 103.2±16.0, P=.04) and gait speed (0.92±0.27
vs 0.99±0.26 m/sec, P<.01). In secondary analyses stratified by subject's
baseline FES, those with lower than average confidence (N=21)
improved significantly both FES score (84.4±11.8 vs 94.5±17.9, P<.01)
and gait speed (0.79±0.26 vs 0.90±0.28 m/sec, P<.01), while no similar
improvement was observed in subjects (N=22) with higher baseline
confidence (112.5±6.6 vs 111.5±7.5, P=.56 and 1.03±0.22 vs 1.07±0.21
m/sec, P=.41). After adjustment for age, gender and baseline gait
speed, subjects with lower baseline confidence had higher odds than
the others to improve their confidence (AdjOR=10.8, 95%CI 1.8-
64.8 P=.01) and gait speed (AdjOR=3.3, 95%CI 0.6-19.7, P=.19) at
follow-up.
Conclusions: This pilot program of low intensity exercise modestly improved
participants' fear of falling and gait speed. Interestingly, subjects
with higher baseline fear of falling seemed more likely to benefit.
Despite methodological limitations (pre-post comparisons, small
sample), these results suggest that measuring fear of falling might be
useful to better target subjects most likely to benefit from similar
programs.
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Création de la notice
19/11/2007 10:14
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:27
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