Exploring triangulation in infancy : Two contrasted cases.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_38317
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Exploring triangulation in infancy : Two contrasted cases.
Périodique
Family Process
Auteur(s)
Fivaz-Depeursinge E., Favez N.
ISSN
0014-7370 (Print)
ISSN-L
0014-7370
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Volume
45
Numéro
1
Pages
3-18
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Case Reports ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Two contrasted father-mother-infant interactions are observed longitudinally during trilogue play. They illustrate the contribution of recent research to the exploration of triangulation in infancy: namely, the infant's capacity to handle triangular interactions and share her affects with her two parents, and the way that this capacity is recruited in functional versus problematic alliances. It is likely that an infant under stress when interacting with one parent will protest at that parent and also at the other. Such is the case when, for example, the father acts intrusively while playing with his baby. The infant is then driven to avert and turns to the mother. The regulation of this dyadic intrusion-avoidance pattern at family level depends on the family alliance. When coparenting is supportive, the mother validates the infant's bid for help without interfering with the father. Thus, the problematic pattern is contained in the dyad, and the infant's triangular capacities remain in the service of her own developmental goals. But when coparenting is hostile-competitive, the mother ignores the infant's bid or engages with her in a way that interferes with her play with her father. In this case, the infant's triangular capacities are used to relieve the tension between the parents. The importance of tracing family process back to infancy for family therapy is discussed.
Mots-clé
Adult, Affect, Anxiety/prevention & control, Anxiety/psychology, Child, Cooperative Behavior, Family/psychology, Father-Child Relations, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infant, Male, Mother-Child Relations, Play and Playthings, Psychological Theory
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
19/11/2007 10:13
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:26
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