Too good to be cautious: High implicit self-esteem predicts self-reported dangerous mobile phone use

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_36E05682196B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Too good to be cautious: High implicit self-esteem predicts self-reported dangerous mobile phone use
Périodique
Computers in Human Behavior
Auteur(s)
Lannoy Séverine, Chatard Armand, Selimbegovic Leila, Tello Nina, Van der Linden Martial, Heeren Alexandre, Billieux Joël
ISSN
0747-5632
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
103
Pages
208-213
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Mobile phone use and misuse have become a pressing challenge in today’s society. Dangerous mobile phone use,
such as the use of a mobile phone while driving, is widely practiced, though banned in several jurisdictions.
Research aiming at unfolding the psychological predictors of dangerous mobile phone use have so far been
scarce. Especially, researchers have never taken the role of self-esteem into account, which is unfortunate given
prior research linking self-esteem to addictive mobile phone use. In the present study, we evaluated the associations
between both explicit and implicit self-esteem and dangerous mobile phone use, with a particular focus
on phoning while driving. To do so, we assessed implicit self-esteem among 95 participants (89 females) via the
Implicit Association Test and explicit self-esteem via a self-reported measure. Problematic mobile phone use and
demographic data were assessed with self-reported measures. Implicit self-esteem predicted dangerous mobile
phone use, even after we controlled for demographic data and mobile phone dependence. Explicit self-esteem,
however, was related to neither dependence nor dangerous use of the mobile phone, thereby supporting the
importance of distinguishing between explicit and implicit self-esteem. Our results set the scene for new research
avenues regarding mobile phone use while driving.
Mots-clé
Human-Computer Interaction, Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), General Psychology, mobile Phone, Self-esteem
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
31/10/2019 16:19
Dernière modification de la notice
29/01/2020 7:19
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