Counsellor behaviours and patient language during brief motivational interventions: a sequential analysis of speech

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_35D8541B395F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Counsellor behaviours and patient language during brief motivational interventions: a sequential analysis of speech
Périodique
Addiction
Auteur(s)
Gaume J., Gmel G., Faouzi M., Daeppen J.B.
ISSN
1360-0443[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
103
Numéro
11
Pages
1793-1800
Langue
anglais
Résumé
AIMS: To investigate empirically the hypothesized relationship between counsellor motivational interviewing (MI) skills and patient change talk (CT) by analysing the articulation between counsellor behaviours and patient language during brief motivational interventions (BMI) addressing at-risk alcohol consumption. DESIGN: Sequential analysis of psycholinguistic codes obtained by two independent raters using the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC), version 2.0. SETTING: Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of BMI in an emergency department. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 97 patients tape-recorded when receiving BMI. MEASUREMENTS: MISC variables were categorized into three counsellor behaviours (MI-consistent, MI-inconsistent and 'other') and three kinds of patient language (CT, counter-CT (CCT) and utterances not linked with the alcohol topic). Observed transition frequencies, conditional probabilities and significance levels based on odds ratios were computed using sequential analysis software. FINDINGS: MI-consistent behaviours were the only counsellor behaviours that were significantly more likely to be followed by patient CT. Those behaviours were significantly more likely to be followed by patient change exploration (CT and CCT) while MI-inconsistent behaviours and 'other' counsellor behaviours were significantly more likely to be followed by utterances not linked with the alcohol topic and significantly less likely to be followed by CT. MI-consistent behaviours were more likely after change exploration, whereas 'other' counsellor behaviours were more likely only after utterances not linked with the alcohol topic. CONCLUSIONS: Findings lend support to the hypothesized relationship between MI-consistent behaviours and CT, highlight the importance of patient influence on counsellor behaviour and emphasize the usefulness of MI techniques and spirit during brief interventions targeting change enhancement.
Mots-clé
Alcohol Drinking, Alcohol Drinking/prevention & control, Communication, Counseling, Counseling/methods, Emergency Service, Hospital, Humans, Interview, Psychological, Language, Motivation, Professional-Patient Relations, Psycholinguistics, Psychotherapy, Brief, Reproducibility of Results, Risk Factors, Switzerland, Verbal Behavior
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/03/2009 12:48
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:23
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