Coevolution of adaptive technology, maladaptive culture and population size in a producer-scrounger game.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_33117DB03AF0.P001.pdf (783.11 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_33117DB03AF0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Coevolution of adaptive technology, maladaptive culture and population size in a producer-scrounger game.
Périodique
Proceedings of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences
Auteur(s)
Lehmann L., Feldman M.W.
ISSN
0962-8452 (Print)
ISSN-L
0962-8452
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
276
Numéro
1674
Pages
3853-3862
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Technology (i.e. tools, methods of cultivation and domestication, systems of construction and appropriation, machines) has increased the vital rates of humans, and is one of the defining features of the transition from Malthusian ecological stagnation to a potentially perpetual rising population growth. Maladaptations, on the other hand, encompass behaviours, customs and practices that decrease the vital rates of individuals. Technology and maladaptations are part of the total stock of culture carried by the individuals in a population. Here, we develop a quantitative model for the coevolution of cumulative adaptive technology and maladaptive culture in a 'producer-scrounger' game, which can also usefully be interpreted as an 'individual-social' learner interaction. Producers (individual learners) are assumed to invent new adaptations and maladaptations by trial-and-error learning, insight or deduction, and they pay the cost of innovation. Scroungers (social learners) are assumed to copy or imitate (cultural transmission) both the adaptations and maladaptations generated by producers. We show that the coevolutionary dynamics of producers and scroungers in the presence of cultural transmission can have a variety of effects on population carrying capacity. From stable polymorphism, where scroungers bring an advantage to the population (increase in carrying capacity), to periodic cycling, where scroungers decrease carrying capacity, we find that selection-driven cultural innovation and transmission may send a population on the path of indefinite growth or to extinction.
Mots-clé
Adaptation, Physiological, Biological Evolution, Cultural Characteristics, Game Theory, Humans, Learning, Models, Biological, Models, Economic, Population Density, Technology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
04/05/2011 15:04
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:18
Données d'usage