Pre-hatching maternal effects and the tasty chick hypothesis

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_31DC017F4E97
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Pre-hatching maternal effects and the tasty chick hypothesis
Périodique
Evolutionary Ecology Research
Auteur(s)
Roulin A., Gasparini J., Froissart L.
ISSN
1522-0613
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Numéro
3
Pages
463-473
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Question: Are maternal effects (i.e. maternal transfer of immune components to their offspring via the placenta or the egg) specifically directed to the offspring on which ectoparasites predictably aggregate?
Organisms: The barn owl (Tyto alba) because late-hatched offspring are the main target of the ectoparasitic fly Carnus hemapterus.
Hypothesis: Pre-hatching maternal effects enhance parasite resistance of late- compared with early-hatched nestlings.
Search method: To disentangle the effect of natal from rearing ranks on parasite intensity, we exchanged hatchlings between nests to allocate early- and late-hatched hatchlings randomly in the within-brood age hierarchy.
Result: After controlling for rearing ranks, cross-fostered late-hatched nestlings were less parasitized but lighter than cross-fostered early-hatched nestlings.
Conclusion: Pre-hatching maternal effects increase parasite resistance of late-hatched offspring at a growth cost.
Mots-clé
growth, hatching asynchrony, host-parasite interactions, maternal effects, tasty chick hypothesis.
Web of science
Création de la notice
29/01/2008 13:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:17
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