Exclusion of the fittest predicts microbial community diversity in fluctuating environments.

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_31636AF1B4BD
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Exclusion of the fittest predicts microbial community diversity in fluctuating environments.
Périodique
Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
Auteur(s)
Shibasaki S., Mobilia M., Mitri S.
ISSN
1742-5662 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1742-5662
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
10/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
18
Numéro
183
Pages
20210613
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Microorganisms live in environments that inevitably fluctuate between mild and harsh conditions. As harsh conditions may cause extinctions, the rate at which fluctuations occur can shape microbial communities and their diversity, but we still lack an intuition on how. Here, we build a mathematical model describing two microbial species living in an environment where substrate supplies randomly switch between abundant and scarce. We then vary the rate of switching as well as different properties of the interacting species, and measure the probability of the weaker species driving the stronger one extinct. We find that this probability increases with the strength of demographic noise under harsh conditions and peaks at either low, high, or intermediate switching rates depending on both species' ability to withstand the harsh environment. This complex relationship shows why finding patterns between environmental fluctuations and diversity has historically been difficult. In parameter ranges where the fittest species was most likely to be excluded, however, the beta diversity in larger communities also peaked. In sum, how environmental fluctuations affect interactions between a few species pairs predicts their effect on the beta diversity of the whole community.
Mots-clé
beta diversity, chemostat, competitive exclusion, demographic noise, environmental switching, intermediate disturbance hypothesis
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
12/10/2021 8:55
Dernière modification de la notice
16/10/2021 5:34
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