Prejudice matters: Understanding the reactions of Whites to affirmative action programs targeted to benefit Blacks

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Etat: Supprimée
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2F553205B700
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Prejudice matters: Understanding the reactions of Whites to affirmative action programs targeted to benefit Blacks
Périodique
Journal of Applied Psychology
Auteur(s)
James E. H., Brief A. P., Dietz J., Cohen R. R.
ISSN
0021-9010
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2001
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
86
Numéro
6
Pages
1120-1128
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The authors examined, in 2 studies, the effects of equal employment opportunity/affirmative action (EEO/AA) policies on Whites' job-related attitudes, First. in an experiment, White prospective job recruits, as expected. rated a potential employer whose EEO/AA policies were framed as targeted to benefit Blacks as less attractive than a potential employer whose EEO/AA policies were trained more generally. Second, the results of a field study showed that prejudice against Black, moderated the relationship between Whites' perceptions that their organization's EEO/AA policies were targeted to benefit Blacks and their satisfaction with promotion opportunities. Specifically, among prejudiced Whites, this relationship was negative and considerable in size (r = -39, p < 01); whereas, among nonprejudiced Whites, it was negligible (r = -04. ns). The implication,. of our findings for the study of prejudice in organizations are discussed.
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05/05/2009 11:08
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:13
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