Stress and the pituitary-adrenal axis

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_2B1D3ED00559
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Stress and the pituitary-adrenal axis
Périodique
Bailliere's Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Auteur(s)
Gaillard  R. C., Al-Damluji  S.
ISSN
0950-351X (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/1987
Volume
1
Numéro
2
Pages
319-54
Notes
Journal Article
Review --- Old month value: May
Résumé
The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms. Numerous factors such as CRF, vasopressin, oxytocin, angiotensin II and conceivably other hormones--all controlled by various substances acting on central locations--stimulate the release of the stress hormone ACTH. On the other hand, glucocorticoids inhibit the secretion of ACTH by acting at the hypothalamic and/or pituitary level. The release of ACTH is therefore the final outcome of the interactions between the hypothalamus, the adrenal gland and possibly other organs. The multimolecular nature of the factors responsible for the control of the pituitary-adrenal axis is an attractive hypothesis because of the great variety of stress stimuli. The various factors could have specific roles in various stress situations. They provide a highly sensitive mechanism regulating very finely the stress hormone in response to a whole variety of endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Depending on the type of stress, they may therefore singly or in combination affect the amount and duration of ACTH and steroid secretion. The released glucocorticoids may then produce their numerous effects on inflammatory and immunological processes, carbohydrate metabolism, shock and water balance. It has been postulated that these effects may be important in order to prevent host responses from over-reacting to stress and threatening homeostasis. However, proof of the necessity of the glucocorticoid hypersecretion in response to stress remains elusive.
Mots-clé
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/physiology Animals Energy Metabolism Hormones/secretion Humans Pituitary-Adrenal System/physiology/*physiopathology Stress/*physiopathology Stress, Psychological/*physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
15/02/2008 16:57
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:10
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