Influence of Pig Farming on the Human Nasal Microbiota: Key Role of Airborne Microbial Communities

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 2018_Kraemer_Influence_ApplEnvironMicrobiol_e02470.pdf (2121.53 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_2AE5BFCFFB65
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Influence of Pig Farming on the Human Nasal Microbiota: Key Role of Airborne Microbial Communities
Périodique
Applied and environmental microbiology
Auteur(s)
Kraemer J.G., Ramette A., Aebi S., Oppliger A., Hilty M.
ISSN
1098-5336 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0099-2240
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/03/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
84
Numéro
6
Pages
e02470-17[1-13]
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
It has been hypothesized that the environment can influence the composition of the nasal microbiota. However, the direct influence of pig farming on the anterior and posterior nasal microbiota is unknown. Using a cross-sectional design, pig farms (n = 28) were visited in 2014 to 2015, and nasal swabs from 43 pig farmers and 56 pigs, as well as 27 air samples taken in the vicinity of the pig enclosures, were collected. As controls, nasal swabs from 17 cow farmers and 26 non-animal-exposed individuals were also included. Analyses of the microbiota were performed based on 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and the DADA2 pipeline to define sequence variants (SVs). We found that pig farming is strongly associated with specific microbial signatures (including alpha- and beta-diversity), which are reflected in the microbiota of the human nose. Furthermore, the microbial communities were more similar within the same farm compared to between the different farms, indicating a specific microbiota pattern for each pig farm. In total, there were 82 SVs that occurred significantly more abundantly in samples from pig farms than from cow farmers and nonexposed individuals (i.e., the core pig farm microbiota). Of these, nine SVs were significantly associated with the posterior part of the human nose. The results strongly indicate that pig farming is associated with a distinct human nose microbiota. Finally, the community structures derived by the DADA2 pipeline showed an excellent agreement with the outputs of the mothur pipeline which was revealed by procrustes analyses.
IMPORTANCE The knowledge about the influence of animal keeping on the human microbiome is important. Previous research has shown that pets significantly affect the microbial communities of humans. However, the effect of animal farming on the human microbiota is less clear, although it is known that the air at farms and, in particular, at pig farms is charged with large amounts of dust, bacteria, and fungi. In this study, we simultaneously investigated the nasal microbiota of pigs, humans, and the environment at pig farms. We reveal an enormous impact of pig farming on the human nasal microbiota which is far more pronounced compared to cow farming. In addition, we analyzed the airborne microbiota and found significant associations suggesting an animal-human transmission of the microbiota within pig farms. We also reveal that microbial patterns are farm specific, suggesting that the environment influences animals and humans in a similar manner.
Mots-clé
Agriculture, Air Microbiology, Animals, Bacteria/classification, Bacteria/genetics, Bacteria/isolation & purification, Biodiversity, Cattle, Cross-Sectional Studies, Dust, Farmers, Farms, Fungi/classification, Fungi/genetics, Fungi/isolation & purification, Humans, Male, Microbiota/genetics, Nose/microbiology, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics, Swine
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
23/01/2018 12:29
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:10
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