Logic in seventeenth-century Scottish academic philosophy

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Ressource 1Télécharger: G.Gellera - Logic in 17c Scottish Academic Philosophy.pdf (246.46 [Ko])
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ID Serval
serval:BIB_276F27DE6D57
Type
Partie de livre
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Logic in seventeenth-century Scottish academic philosophy
Titre du livre
Scottish Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century, edited by Alexander Broadie. Oxford University Press 2020
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Gellera Giovanni
Editeur
Oxford University Press
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Langue
anglais
Résumé
For a seventeenth-century Scottish regent, logic was preliminary to all other disciplines and secondary only to Latin. Logic was the trait-d’union between natural language (Latin, grammar, classical literature, the Bible) and the technical philosophical jargon. Logic was also important for theology and apologetics.
Until the 1650s, logic is scholastic, centred on the trivium of logic, rhetoric, and grammar. The influence of Humanism, especially Ramism, is visible in the importance of induction, the treatment of method as a branch of logic, the orientation of logic towards practical tasks. Later in the century, alongside Aristotle, the key figures are René Descartes and Francis Bacon. The “old” Aristotelian logic is made compatible with the “new” method for the acquisition of new truths developed from Cartesian and Baconian insights. The reception of Descartes and Bacon has a common root in scholastic empiricism.
Financement(s)
Fonds national suisse / Carrières / PP00P1_163751
Création de la notice
27/04/2020 12:16
Dernière modification de la notice
23/06/2020 6:21
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