Smoking cessation counseling by residents in an outpatient clinic.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_261D9E6D706C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Smoking cessation counseling by residents in an outpatient clinic.
Périodique
Preventive Medicine
Auteur(s)
Cornuz J., Zellweger J.P., Mounoud C., Decrey H., Pécoud A., Burnand B.
ISSN
0091-7435 (Print)
ISSN-L
0091-7435
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1997
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Numéro
3
Pages
292-296
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Training residents in smoking cessation counseling could be part of tobacco control policy. The effect of such an intervention is unknown in Europe. This study provides an assessment of smoking cessation counseling practices by Swiss residents after an intervention based on behavioral modification. METHOD: In a pre-post blind test trial on smoking cessation counseling practices, residents' perceptions about their own ability to counsel smoking behavior among smoking patients were evaluated for 15 residents trained in general internal medicine and in 247 and 155 smoking patients' reports, respectively before and after a training intervention targeting residents, based on behavioral theory of smoking cessation. RESULTS: Changes in counseling were assessed by interviews with patients. After the intervention, residents asked about smoking habits (77 vs 68%), advised to quit (43 vs 28%), provided counseling for cessation (25 vs 10%), gave self-help materials (7 vs 1%), and arranged follow-up visits (5 vs 1%) more often than before. Residents' self-perception of confidence (5.4 vs 4.6/10) and effectiveness (5.3 vs 4.0/10) in counseling also increased after the intervention. After adjusting for daily cigarette consumption and smoking duration, the likelihood of attempting to quit smoking at either 6 or 12 months was increased in the group of patients attended after the intervention (odds ratio 1.52, 95% confidence intervals 1.07-2.48). However, the likelihood of quitting smoking was not increased among these patients (odds ratio 1.07, 95% CI 0.96-1.14). CONCLUSIONS: Short-term smoking cessation counseling by residents was substantially improved by the intervention. Smokers attended after the intervention were more likely to attempt to quit smoking, but not to have quit at 6- or 12-month follow-up.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Chi-Square Distribution, Confidence Intervals, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Internship and Residency, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Patient Education as Topic/standards, Physician's Role, Program Evaluation, Single-Blind Method, Smoking Cessation/methods, Smoking Cessation/psychology, Type="Geographic">Switzerland, Treatment Outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 13:41
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:04
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