Explaining function with anatomy: language lateralization and corpus callosum size.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_2329E5EC8B09
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Explaining function with anatomy: language lateralization and corpus callosum size.
Périodique
Journal of Neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Josse G., Seghier M.L., Kherif F., Price C.J.
ISSN
1529-2401 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0270-6474
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Volume
28
Numéro
52
Pages
14132-14139
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The anatomy of the corpus callosum (CC) has been advocated as a potential marker for functional lateralization because its size is supposedly proportional to the number of fibers connecting the hemispheres. Previous morphometric studies of this relationship have compared CC size in groups of subjects who are more or less likely to show differences in their lateralization (e.g., left vs right handers). The findings, however, have been inconsistent, and to our knowledge, no previous study has directly compared CC size with lateralization assessed by functional imaging data. We therefore combined anatomical measurements of CC size with left versus right hemisphere language activation in 74 normal subjects. After controlling for perceptual and motor output effects, as well as for global white-matter volume, handedness, gender and age, we found that subjects who had a larger CC showed more left lateralization for language in posterior temporal and inferior frontal regions. Examination of these effects revealed that, as CC size increased, stronger lateralization resulted from more left hemisphere activation in both regions as well as reduced right hemisphere activation in the posterior temporal region. Our observations provide the first clear evidence in normal subjects that the midsagittal surface area of the CC contributes to the degree to which language is functionally lateralized. We discuss the complex interhemispheric processes that might underlie this effect.
Mots-clé
Brain Mapping, Corpus Callosum/anatomy & histology, Corpus Callosum/blood supply, Female, Functional Laterality/physiology, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods, Language, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods, Male, Oxygen/blood
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
22/01/2013 15:41
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:00
Données d'usage