HIV-I induced destruction of neocortical extracellular matrix components in AIDS victims1

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_221C6CCD8948
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
HIV-I induced destruction of neocortical extracellular matrix components in AIDS victims1
Périodique
Neurobiology of Disease
Auteur(s)
Belichenko  P. V., Miklossy  J., Celio  M. R.
ISSN
0969-9961 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1997
Volume
4
Numéro
3-4
Pages
301-310
Notes
PT - Journal Article PT - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Résumé
Neurological dysfunction is not uncommon in patients suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and, when manifested, intimates involvement of the central nervous system. Here, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects preferentially microglial cells, which thereby release substances known to interfere with neuronal function. One class of agents set free in this manner are proteases; these degrade certain components within, and thereby undermine the integrity of, the extracellular matrix (ECM) compartment, which plays a vital role in cell-to-cell communication. We wished to ascertain whether the ECM compartment is indeed disrupted in the brains of AIDS victims. We examined the neocortical areas of 27 AIDS autopsy cases, including 9 with diagnosed HIV-encephalopathy (HIVE); 8 HIV-seronegative cases with various types of brain lesion, including viral infections, were also included in this study. HIV-antigens and DNA were identified by use of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, and ECM components by lectin staining and immunohistochemistry. Of the 27 AIDS cases examined, each of the 9 with HIVE was completely devoid of labeled ECM components; 8 of the 18 without HIVE had incurred substantial losses, and only 2 manifested a normal complement of constituents within this compartment. With respect to stratal and topographic variations, layers II and III were less affected than layers V to VII, as was the frontal cortex relative to other areas. These findings confirmed our expectations of the brain's ECM undergoing degradation following HIV infection, and these changes may well underlie the neurological disturbances manifested in AIDS patients
Mots-clé
AIDS Dementia Complex/metabolism/Pathology/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/Adult/Aged/Aged,80 and over/Brain/Brain Diseases/virology/Cerebral Cortex/Extracellular Matrix Proteins/Female/Frontal Lobe/HIV Seronegativity/physiology/Humans/Male/Middle Aged/Tissue Distribution
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
29/01/2008 19:35
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:59
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