The Cochrane 2018 Review on Brief Interventions in Primary Care for Hazardous and Harmful Alcohol Consumption: A Distillation for Clinicians and Policy Makers.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_2205C07F6674
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
The Cochrane 2018 Review on Brief Interventions in Primary Care for Hazardous and Harmful Alcohol Consumption: A Distillation for Clinicians and Policy Makers.
Périodique
Alcohol and alcoholism
Auteur(s)
Beyer F.R., Campbell F., Bertholet N., Daeppen J.B., Saunders J.B., Pienaar E.D., Muirhead C.R., Kaner EFS
ISSN
1464-3502 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0735-0414
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/07/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
54
Numéro
4
Pages
417-427
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Systematic Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
An updated Cochrane systematic review assessed effectiveness of screening and brief intervention to reduce hazardous or harmful alcohol consumption in general practice or emergency care settings. This paper summarises the implications of the review for clinicians.
Cochrane methods were followed. Reporting accords with PRISMA guidance. We searched multiple resources to September 2017, seeking randomised controlled trials of brief interventions to reduce hazardous or harmful alcohol consumption in people attending general practice, emergency care or other primary care settings for reasons other than alcohol treatment. Brief intervention was defined as a conversation comprising five or fewer sessions of brief advice or brief lifestyle counselling and a total duration of less than 60 min. Our primary outcome was alcohol consumption, measured as or convertible to grams per week. We conducted meta-analyses to assess change in consumption, and subgroup analyses to explore the impact of participant and intervention characteristics.
We included 69 studies, of which 42 were added for this update. Most studies (88%) compared brief intervention to control. The primary meta-analysis included 34 studies and provided moderate-quality evidence that brief intervention reduced consumption compared to control after one year (mean difference -20 g/wk, 95% confidence interval -28 to -12). Subgroup analysis showed a similar effect for men and women.
Brief interventions can reduce harmful and hazardous alcohol consumption in men and women. Short, advice-based interventions may be as effective as extended, counselling-based interventions for patients with harmful levels of alcohol use who are presenting for the first time in a primary care setting.
Mots-clé
Administrative Personnel, Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology, Alcohol Drinking/psychology, Alcohol Drinking/therapy, Alcoholism/epidemiology, Alcoholism/psychology, Alcoholism/therapy, Dangerous Behavior, Early Medical Intervention/methods, Humans, Physicians, Primary Health Care/methods, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/05/2019 14:34
Dernière modification de la notice
23/01/2020 7:19
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