Sign language in childhood epileptic aphasia (Landau-Kleffner syndrome).

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_20208
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Etude de cas (case report): rapporte une observation et la commente brièvement.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Sign language in childhood epileptic aphasia (Landau-Kleffner syndrome).
Périodique
Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Auteur(s)
Perez E.R., Davidoff V.
ISSN
0012-1622
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2001
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
43
Numéro
11
Pages
739-744
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Case Reports ; Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Acquired epileptic aphasia (AEA, or Landau-Kleffner syndrome) is a unique condition in which children can lose oral language (OL) comprehension and expression for a prolonged period. These children can benefit from visual forms of language, mainly sign language (SL), but the quality of SL has never been analyzed. The case is reported here of a boy with AEA who lost speech comprehension and expression from 3 years 6 months to 7 years and was educated in SL from the age of 6 years. His SL was evaluated at the age of 13 years and 6 months and compared with a control child with congenital sensorineural deafness. It was found that: (1) our patient achieved the same proficiency in SL as the control child with deafness; (2) SL learning did not compete with, but perhaps even hastened, the recovery of OL. Intact ability to learn a new linguistic code such as SL suggests that higher-order language areas were preserved and received input from a separate visual route, as shown by neuropsychological and functional imaging research in deaf and hearing signers.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/congenital, Hearing Loss, Sensorineural/diagnosis, Humans, Landau-Kleffner Syndrome/diagnosis, Language Disorders/diagnosis, Language Disorders/therapy, Language Tests, Male, Photic Stimulation, Recovery of Function, Sign Language, Speech Discrimination Tests, Verbal Behavior
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/11/2007 12:14
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:56
Données d'usage