Presence and diversity of Chlamydiae bacteria in Spinturnix myoti, an ectoparasite of bats

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ID Serval
serval:BIB_1DE027DB1313
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Presence and diversity of Chlamydiae bacteria in Spinturnix myoti, an ectoparasite of bats
Périodique
Parasite
Auteur(s)
Thiévent Kevin, Szentiványi Tamara, Aeby Sébastien, Glaizot Olivier, Christe Philippe, Greub Gilbert
ISSN
1776-1042
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/11/2020
Volume
27
Pages
54
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Chlamydia spp. and Chlamydia-like organisms are able to infect vertebrates such as mammals, reptiles and birds, but also arthropods and protozoans. Since they have been detected in bats and bat feces, we expected Chlamydiae bacteria to also be present in the mite Spinturnix myoti, an ectoparasite of mouse-eared bats (Myotis spp.). The prevalence of Chlamydiales in 88 S. myoti was 57.95% and significantly depended on bat host species. In addition, the prevalence was significantly different between bat species living in sympatry or in allopatry. While there was uninterpretable sequencing for 16 samples, eight showed best BLAST hit identities lower than 92.5% and thus corresponded to new family-level lineages according to the established taxonomy cut-off. The four remaining sequences exhibited best BLAST hit identities ranging from 94.2 to 97.4% and were taxonomically assigned to three different family-level lineages, with two of them belonging to the Parachlamydiaceae, one to the Simkaniaceae, and one to the Chlamydiaceae. These results highlighted for the first time the presence of Chlamydia-like organisms and the possible zoonotic origin of Chlamydia sp. in S. myoti ectoparasites of bats, and therefore suggest that these ectoparasites may play a role in maintaining and/or transmitting members of the Chlamydiae phylum within Myotis spp. bat populations. Our results further highlight that the wide diversity of bacteria belonging to the Chlamydiae phylum is largely underestimated.
Mots-clé
Mites, bats, Chlamidiae, vector
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
02/11/2020 12:04
Dernière modification de la notice
18/11/2020 7:24
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