How does playing position affect fatigue-induced changes in high-intensity locomotor and micro-movements patterns during professional rugby union games?

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_1ADA52D50D40
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
How does playing position affect fatigue-induced changes in high-intensity locomotor and micro-movements patterns during professional rugby union games?
Périodique
European journal of sport science
Auteur(s)
Fornasier-Santos C., Millet G.P., Stridgeon P., Brocherie F., Girard O., Nottin S.
ISSN
1536-7290 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1536-7290
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
10/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
21
Numéro
10
Pages
1364-1374
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
AbstractWe questioned whether changes in high-intensity locomotor and micro-movements patterns between the first and second part of each half depend on playing position in the 2014-2015 European rugby union championship winning team. Thirty-three rugby players were grouped according to five playing positions. Players were equipped with micro-electromechanical system including a GPS sampling at 10 Hz and high temporal resolution micro-sensors during 17 Top14 and 7 European games. High-speed movements (HSM), high-intensity accelerations (HIA), repeated high-intensity efforts (RHIE), and high-intensity micro-movements (HIMM) were subsequently compared between four 20-min game periods. No significant group × time interactions were observed for any locomotor variables (p > 0.283). Irrespectively of playing position, the number of HSM (p = 0.019), decreased from 0-20 min to 60-80 min as well as from 40-60 to 60-80 min (p < 0.001) with HIA (p = 0.020) and RHIE (p < 0.001). Significant group × time interaction was found for HIMM (p = 0.03) with a significant decrease observed in back row forwards from 0-20 to 60-80 min periods (-17.5%; ES = 0.6; p = 0.031). In elite rugby union, fatigue-induced changes during the last 20 min are independent from playing positions in high-intensity locomotor patterns in contrary to HIMM. Training drills that include specific RHIE (high-speed and HIA efforts) may be useful to postpone match-related fatigue.
Mots-clé
Acceleration, Adult, Athletic Performance/physiology, Football/physiology, Geographic Information Systems, Humans, Male, Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems, Muscle Fatigue, Running/physiology, GPS, fatigue, locomotor patterns, micro-movements, rugby union
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
05/10/2020 13:51
Dernière modification de la notice
23/10/2021 5:38
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