Drug metabolism in the horse: a review.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_18EED3508698
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Drug metabolism in the horse: a review.
Périodique
Drug testing and analysis
Auteur(s)
Scarth J.P., Teale P., Kuuranne T.
ISSN
1942-7611 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1942-7603
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
3
Numéro
1
Pages
19-53
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
A detailed understanding of equine drug metabolism is important for detection of drug abuse in horseracing and also in veterinary drug development and practice. To date, however, no comprehensive review of equine drug metabolism has been published. The majority of literature regarding equine drug metabolite profiles is derived from sports drug detection research and is generally targeted at detecting marker metabolites of drug abuse. However, the bulk of the literature on equine drug metabolism enzymology is derived from veterinary studies aimed at determining the molecular basis of metabolism. In this article, the phase 1 and 2 metabolisms of seven of the most important classes of drugs monitored in horseracing are reviewed, including: anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS), β₂ -agonists, stimulants, sedatives/tranquilizers, local anesthetics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAIDS)/cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and opioid analgesics. A summary of the literature relating to the enzymology of drug metabolism in this species is also be presented. The future of equine drug metabolism in the area of doping research will be influenced by several factors, including: a possible move towards the increased use of blood and other alternative testing matrices; the development of assays based on intact drug conjugates; the increasing threat of 'designer' and herbal- based products; advances in the use of in vitro technologies; the increased use of liquid-chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry; and the possibility of screening using 'omics' approaches. Also, the recent cloning of a range of equine cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes opens up the potential for carrying out more detailed mechanistic pharmacological and toxicological veterinary studies.

Mots-clé
Animals, Biotransformation, Doping in Sports, Horses/metabolism, Performance-Enhancing Substances/analysis, Performance-Enhancing Substances/pharmacokinetics, Reproducibility of Results, Species Specificity, Substance Abuse Detection/veterinary
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
02/05/2017 14:38
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:49
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