Beyond variability: Subjective timing and the neurophysiology of motor cognition.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_18974F763108
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Beyond variability: Subjective timing and the neurophysiology of motor cognition.
Périodique
Brain stimulation
Auteur(s)
Perruchoud D., Fiorio M., Cesari P., Ionta S.
ISSN
1876-4754 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1876-4754
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Numéro
1
Pages
175-180
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Validation Studies
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Movement simulation helps increasing the chances to reach goals. A cognitive task used to study the neuro-behavioral aspects of movement simulation is mental rotation: people mentally re-orient rotated pictures of hands. However, the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in mental rotation is largely controversial.
Such inconsistency could arise from potential methodological flaws in experimental procedures and data analysis. In particular, until now, the timing of M1 activity has been computed in absolute terms: from the onset of mental rotation (onset-locked), neglecting intra- and inter-subject variability.
A novel phase-locked approach is introduced to synchronize the same phases of cognitive processing among different subjects and sessions. This approach was validated in the particular case of corticospinal excitability of the motor cortex during mental rotation.
We identified the relative time-windows during which the excitability of M1 is effector-specifically modulated by different features of mental rotation. These time windows correspond to the 55%-85% of the subjective timing.
In sum, (i) we introduce a new method to study the neurophysiology of motor cognition, and (ii) validating this method, we shed new light on the involvement of M1 in movement simulation.
Mots-clé
Cognition/physiology, Hand, Humans, Imagination/physiology, Male, Motor Cortex/physiology, Rotation, Time Factors, Young Adult, Functional equivalence, Mental rotation of hands, Motor-evoked potentials, Phase-locked data analysis, Primary motor cortex, Temporal dynamics, Transcranial magnetic stimulation
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
26/10/2017 10:15
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:49
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